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  • Mechanical testing | ASO

    Mechanical tests Discover some of our methods. Tensile strength, flexural strength In a tensile test (destructive material testing) according to DIN EN ISO 527-1, the force and change in length of a sample are measured as a function of the applied elongation. This measurement can also be carried out at a defined temperature (-35 to +250°C). The tensile test is used to determine the modulus of elasticity, the tensile strength and the elongation at break of a material. Changes in these material properties after artificial aging or exposure to media are also interesting. In a bending test, the sample is subjected to quasi-static pressure. In the 3-point bending test according to DIN EN ISO 178, the test sample is positioned on two supports and loaded in the middle with a test stamp. Areas of application here include determining the bending modulus, the bending strength and more. Impact strength, notched impact strength In an impact test according to DIN EN ISO 179-1, the resistance of a material to impact (dynamic) stress is determined. In the notched bar impact test, the workpiece is notched before the test, which creates increased stress peaks at the notch. A pendulum hammer with a certain kinetic energy hits the back of the sample and breaks it. This test can also be carried out at defined temperatures. Low temperatures increase the brittleness of the material (cold brittleness). Printing forming residue The compression set is an important parameter for elastomers that are used as seals, for example. The test specimen is first compressed to a certain proportion of the thickness and fixed at a constant compression set. This state is maintained for a defined time, whereby additional influencing factors such as increased temperature can act on the test specimen. After the load is removed, the permanent deformation is measured. If the remaining compression deformation is too high, the seal's effectiveness could be limited. Tear strength In the tear propagation test, a defined defect is introduced into a test specimen, for example by means of a knife cut. The test specimen is then loaded at this point and the force measured as the crack propagates. The measured force provides information about the tear resistance of the material. The test is usually carried out according to DIN ISO 34-1 on elastomers for seals and according to DIN EN ISO 8067 on foams. ​ The tear resistance of film packaging is particularly important. The test according to ISO 34–1, ISO 6383–1, EN 495–2 and DIN 53363 simulates the film behavior when a package is opened. Ideally, the tear force and the tear force are the same - this allows a film bag to be opened in a controlled manner and the contents removed. If, however, the maximum force until the sample tears is relatively high, the tearing can suddenly continue after the first tear. For the end user, this usually leads to accidental spilling and thus often to a loss of the contents. In addition, the packaging becomes unusable and cannot be resealed. Adhesive strength and peel strength The peel strength, i.e. the resistance of a surface structure to detachment, is of particular interest for films, fleeces, carpets, upholstery fabrics and adhesive tapes. Depending on the application and test standard, the adhesive force can be peeled off at a peel angle of 180°, 90° or at any other angle. Similarly, roller devices can be used to maintain defined peel angles, for example in the roller peeling test according to DIN EN 1372 with a 90° peel angle or in DIN EN 1464 with a 60° peel angle. Do you have questions? Our experienced team is available to meet your individual requirements and provide you with high-quality analytical solutions. Contact

  • Klimaneutralitätszuschlag | ASO

    Automotive Analytical services for automotive suppliers Our commitment In order to make our commitment to climate protection transparent, we follow the standards of the Greenhouse Gas Protocol. ​ Direct emissions These come from our own or controlled sources, such as the operation of our laboratory equipment and company vehicles. Indirect emissions from purchased energy These emissions arise from the production of the energy we use, such as electricity and heat. Further indirect emissions along the value chain These include emissions from business travel, our employees’ commuting and the production of consumables. For detailed information and guidelines, please refer to the Greenhouse Gas Protocol , an internationally recognized institution in the field of greenhouse gas accounting. Our profile We have carried out a comprehensive analysis of our emissions in our analytical laboratory with 50 employees, which specializes in chemical, physical and other non-destructive analyses. As a traditional chemical site with a 100-year history, there are a number of promising measures available. Here are the main results: ​ power consumption Our laboratory equipment and the air conditioning of our premises are the main sources of Scope 1 and 2 emissions. By investing in more energy-efficient equipment and switching to renewable energy, we aim to reduce these emissions by 30% in the next few years. Business trips and commuting Business trips and the daily commute of our employees contribute significantly to Scope 3 emissions. We encourage the switch to public transport, offer incentives for carpooling and increasingly use digital communication tools to minimize the need for travel. ​ Material consumption The consumption of chemicals and other laboratory materials is another significant emission factor. We focus on efficient use of resources and sustainable waste management. financing For years, ASO has relied on co-financing with customers to finance the measures presented. The high level of approval from our customers for investments in reducing climate impact confirms our approach. ASO offers an optional 5% surcharge on the services offered. The customer can deselect this package at any time if desired. measures The ASO has carried out a climate impact analysis, which is reviewed and updated annually by the management. New measures are outlined, budgeted and prioritized at the same time. The success of the measures is checked using the QM system accredited according to ISO17025. The measures implemented and those planned for the current year can be requested from the ASO management. Every contribution counts! Your support enables us to finance these internal projects and sustainably improve our climate impact. Together we are creating a better future for all of us. Contact now!

  • Plastics | ASO

    Automotive Analytical services for automotive suppliers Our plastics laboratory has numerous microscopic and spectroscopic methods available to determine the cause of contamination or injection molding defects, for example, as part of a plastics damage analysis . The experts in our plastics laboratory also have extensive experience in analyzing problems during the further processing of plastics, such as galvanization or painting, or when unexpected changes occur to the plastic component due to external influences. ​ Our plastics testing laboratory checks the specifications of an injection-molded part and/or the polymer. Component tests include, for example, mechanical, thermal, optical or rheological properties, but also geometry, density, paint layer thickness, electrical resistance, etc. In addition, our chemical laboratory offers you polymer characterization through chemical analysis of the plastic used with regard to polymer type, additive and filler content, moisture, solution viscosity and many other parameters, or we analyze the emissions emanating from the component. ​ In a test laboratory specially designed for the automotive industry , plastic products are tested for their quality. Environmental simulation allows the influence of light, temperature, humidity, harmful gases or salt mist to be reproduced in the laboratory. In addition, the chemical resistance of the plastic surface to various media (sweat, oils, sunscreen, solvents, etc.) can be tested and the abrasion resistance examined. ​ We would be happy to provide you with a non-binding offer for plastics testing that is optimized to your requirements. Feel free to contact us! YOUR EXPERT Dr. André Muthig Mail andre.muthig@aso-labor.de phone +49 6022 81 2451 Test standards Solution viscosity Viscosity number and intrinsic viscosity Solution viscosity measures the average molecular weight of plastics by measuring the viscosity number VN. This enables the monitoring of processing and usage properties as well as the investigation of aging, chemical effects and weathering. Standards such as DIN EN ISO 307 for polyamides and DIN ISO 1628-5 for polyesters regulate the process. Other parameters such as relative viscosity and specific viscosity describe the change in the solvent caused by the polymer. The intrinsic viscosity (also called limiting viscosity) is estimated by series of measurements or approximate methods such as that of Billmeyer. Melt flow index Volume flow rate and mass flow rate The melt flow index is often referred to by the English abbreviations MFI (melt flow index) or MI (melt index). It is used to characterize the flow behavior of a thermoplastic and thus its degree of polymerization. Through comparative measurements, the MFI is suitable for detecting material contamination and processing defects. Therefore, the melt flow index is used as standard in quality assurance or damage analysis. ​ A distinction is made between the volume flow rate (MVR, melt volume-flow rate) and the mass flow rate (MFR). Both are linked to each other via the melt density; the measurement method is described in DIN EN ISO 1133 and is a routine procedure in plastics analysis. Soxhlet extraction Extraction by organic solvents DIN EN ISO 6427 describes a variety of possible processes for a wide range of plastics and solvents. The method to be used depends on the material and the question. The extracts enable statements to be made regarding the dissolved monomers and oligomers, plasticizers, non-crosslinked resin components, emulsifiers and more. Moisture content of polymer granules The residual moisture is an important parameter in the further processing of plastics. Excessive moisture leads to injection molding defects or even polymer degradation during further processing. Using the Karl Fischer method described in DIN EN ISO 15512, the water content is specifically determined quantitatively by titration. Other emissions when heating the granulate are not included in the measurement. The plastic sample is heated in an airtight sealed vessel and the released moisture is transferred to the titration unit via a carrier gas stream. Ignition residue and ash content The ignition residue describes the residual mass of an organic substance after combustion and continuous heating at high temperatures until constant mass is reached. It is a measure of the content of inorganic components in the polymer, such as glass fibers. DIN EN ISO 3451-1 describes several methods for determining this residual mass, called ash or sulfate ash (depending on the process). Melt flow index Volume flow rate and mass flow rate The melt flow index is often referred to by the English abbreviations MFI (melt flow index) or MI (melt index). It is used to characterize the flow behavior of a thermoplastic and thus its degree of polymerization. Through comparative measurements, the MFI is suitable for detecting material contamination and processing defects. Therefore, the melt flow index is used as standard in quality assurance or damage analysis. ​ A distinction is made between the volume flow rate (MVR, melt volume-flow rate) and the mass flow rate (MFR). Both are linked to each other via the melt density; the measurement method is described in DIN EN ISO 1133 and is a routine procedure in plastics analysis. Melt flow index The melt flow index is often referred to by the English abbreviations MFI (melt flow index) or MI (melt index). It is used to characterize the flow behavior of a thermoplastic and thus its degree of polymerization. Through comparative measurements, the MFI is suitable for detecting material contamination and processing defects. Therefore, the melt flow index is used as standard in quality assurance or damage analysis. ​ A distinction is made between the volume flow rate (MVR, melt volume-flow rate) and the mass flow rate (MFR). Both are linked to each other via the melt density; the measurement method is described in DIN EN ISO 1133 and is a routine procedure in plastics analysis. Automotive Application examples Solution viscosity Recycling of plastic windows Particle size analysis Test standards Injection molding defects During injection molding, various molding defects can occur, such as streaks, sink marks, blistering, weld lines, shiny spots, dull spots, warping, etc. Some affect the optical appearance and can lead to complaints, while others deteriorate the mechanical properties and can even lead to premature failure. This can also negatively affect further processing, such as galvanization. ​ The damage analysis of injection molding defects begins with the classification of defects based on characteristics on the component surface or cross-sectional examinations. By identifying various defect characteristics, the physical causes can be narrowed down. An analysis of the influencing factors provides information on how to reduce defects or avoid them by adjusting the processing parameters. Our specialized testing laboratory for plastics analyzes cases of damage to injection molded parts. Errors in the plastic galvanization Nowadays, PC/ABS materials are mostly used for plastic electroplating. The quality of electroplated plastic surfaces is also influenced by the manufacturing conditions of the plastic parts themselves. Increased reject rates often occur due to spots, specks, bubbles or insufficient layer adhesion. The causes of these defects can be found in both the injection molding process and the electroplating. Injection molding defects on the raw part are usually also visible on the finished galvanized component. However, hidden defects that were not observed on the raw part can also be amplified by the galvanizing process and thus become visible. In addition, there are defects that can be traced back to deposition defects in the galvanization process, over-aging of the baths or unsuitable galvanization conditions. A systematic, microscopic analysis of the finished part and the raw part helps to determine the cause of defects in galvanized plastic parts and reduce scrap rates. Contamination of components Contamination can occur at any stage of the process, from raw materials to transportation. Various spectroscopic and microscopic methods are used to analyze damage depending on the type of contamination. ​ For liquid raw materials, NMR spectroscopy is recommended for the detection of organic contaminants, while XRF spectroscopy is suitable for trace inorganic contaminants. ​ In the case of surface contamination, scanning electron microscopy and IR spectroscopy are used to analyse the defects. The composition and morphology of the contamination provide clues as to its origin. Some contamination is invisible but can cause problems during further processing. Specially adapted examination methods are required here. ​ A systematic damage analysis enables the characterization and determination of the cause of contamination on plastic parts, which helps to reduce scrap rates. Our damage analysis tailored to your requirements can help with this. Application examples Flow line analysis injection molding Galvanization of plastic Fiber optic orientation Defect analysis Raman spectroscopy Do you have questions? Our experienced team is available to meet your individual requirements and provide you with high-quality analytical solutions. Contact

  • Contact | ASO

    We look forward to hearing from you! Where to find us. Our testing laboratory is centrally located in Germany, on the edge of the Rhine-Main area, about 50 km southeast of Frankfurt am Main. If you are arriving by car or train, use our map and report to the plant security (Gate 4). If there are problems with the delivery of samples by courier, please use the alternative address Glanzstoffstraße 1 in 63906 Erlenbach. Contact Industrial Center Obernburg 63784 Obernburg +49 6022 81-2668 info@aso-labor.de First Name Last Name E-Mail Company Country Code Phone Message File upload Upload supported file (max. 15MB) I have taken note of the privacy policy. Data protection Send Thank you very much! We will get back to you as soon as possible. Directions

  • X-ray structure analysis | ASO

    X-ray structure analysis The principle briefly explained X-ray structure analysis with powder diffractometry X-ray structure analysis allows the identification of crystalline materials via X-ray diffraction (XRD) on the crystal lattice. The position and intensity of the maxima in the diffraction pattern depends on the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal lattice and is therefore specific to a material. X-ray structure analysis is usually carried out on fine powders, is therefore also called powder diffractometry and is used to: ​ Identification of crystalline solids and their quantification Determination of the crystal modifications of a compound (phase analysis) Measurement of lattice parameters, crystallite sizes and degree of crystallinity Characterization of hydroxyapatite with respect to crystallinity, phase purity and Ca/P ratio according to ISO 13779-3 Phase purity analysis Do you have questions? Our experienced team is available to meet your individual requirements and provide you with high-quality analytical solutions. Contact

  • Surface analysis and microscopy | ASO

    Surface analysis and microscopy Discover our possibilities. Electrons microscopy (REM-EDX) The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a device for imaging surface structures. It produces images with high resolution and depth of field. In addition, the distribution of different materials can be visualized. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) can also be used to analyze the local elemental composition of the various sample areas. ​ application areas Structure and composition of components Damage analysis Stains and dirt Analysis of competitive products surfaces Analytics (ESCA) Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (also XPS) analyzes (semiquantitatively) the elemental composition of the uppermost nanometers (10-15 atomic layers) of solids. The method also provides information about the bonding states of the elements. The removal of the layers by sputtering allows the measurement of the depth distribution of elements (depth profile). ​ application areas Liability Wetting problems Paint peeling Surface and interface characterization Corrosion protection Reactivity of catalysts Raster force microscopy (AFM) AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) is a microscopic technique in which the surface of a sample is scanned with a fine needle. This provides complete three-dimensional information about the topography of the surface. With suitable samples, atomic resolution is achieved. The measurements can be carried out in air or in liquids. ​ application areas Analysis of microroughness Measuring the smallest height differences Visualization of the local distribution of chemical information on the surface molecule Spectroscopy (IR/Raman/ UV-Vis) In molecular spectroscopy, the incoming light is absorbed or scattered. This is characteristic of certain molecular fragments. The recorded spectra show specific bands for certain molecular components, which can be used to identify organic materials in particular. ​ application areas Analysis of organic components Polymer characterization Damage analysis Stains and dirt Analysis of competitive products Roughness Measurement Using a phertometer, the surface of the sample is scanned with a needle of defined geometry and standardized roughness parameters are calculated. ​ application areas profile Waviness and roughness medium roughness Bearing ratio Roughness depth Do you have questions? Our experienced team is available to meet your individual requirements and provide you with high-quality analytical solutions. Contact

  • Kontakt | ASO

    We look forward to hearing from you! Where to find us. Our testing laboratory is centrally located in Germany, on the edge of the Rhine-Main area, about 50 km southeast of Frankfurt am Main. If you are arriving by car or train, use our map and report to the plant security (Gate 4). If there are problems with the delivery of samples by courier, please use the alternative address Glanzstoffstraße 1 in 63906 Erlenbach. Contact Industrial Center Obernburg 63784 Obernburg +49 6022 81-2668 info@aso-labor.de First Name Last Name E-Mail Company Country Code Phone Message File upload Upload supported file (max. 15MB) I have taken note of the privacy policy. Data protection Send Thank you very much! We will get back to you as soon as possible. Directions

  • Damage analytics | ASO

    Damage Analytics We get to the bottom of the causes. Process of a damage analysis A failure analysis is a process of investigating and identifying the causes of damage to materials or products. The process may vary depending on the type of damage and material, but generally it includes the following steps: ​ Damage inspection: Before the analysis begins, the damaged material or product is examined more closely and background information about the component and possible impacts on the component is collected. Sampling: To perform the analysis, representative samples of the damaged material or product are taken. These samples are then prepared for further testing. Analysis: Samples are examined using different analysis methods depending on the type of damage and the material. This may include microscopy (light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy), spectroscopy (IR spectroscopy, XPS), chemical analysis, thermal analysis, etc. Reporting: Once the analysis is complete, the results are documented and summarized in a report. The report contains information about the type of damage, possible causes of the damage, and recommendations for resolving the problem. Implementation: Recommendations are then made to correct the problem to ensure that the material or product is safe and reliable again. It is important to note that the choice of analysis methods and the performance of the analysis should be carried out by qualified and experienced experts to ensure that the results are reliable and accurate. Process of a damage analysis A failure analysis is a process of investigating and identifying the causes of damage to materials or products. The process may vary depending on the type of damage and material, but generally it includes the following steps: ​ Damage inspection: Before the analysis begins, the damaged material or product is examined more closely and background information about the component and possible impacts on the component is collected. Sampling: To perform the analysis, representative samples of the damaged material or product are taken. These samples are then prepared for further testing. Analysis: Samples are examined using different analysis methods depending on the type of damage and the material. This may include microscopy (light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy), spectroscopy (IR spectroscopy, XPS), chemical analysis, thermal analysis, etc. Reporting: Once the analysis is complete, the results are documented and summarized in a report. The report contains information about the type of damage, possible causes of the damage, and recommendations for resolving the problem. Implementation: Recommendations are then made to correct the problem to ensure that the material or product is safe and reliable again. It is important to note that the choice of analysis methods and the performance of the analysis should be carried out by qualified and experienced experts to ensure that the results are reliable and accurate. YOUR EXPERT Stefan Sollinger Mail stefan.sollinger@aso-labor.de phone +49 6022 81 2672 Application examples Damage Analysis Fabrics Paint adhesion problems Cleaning cloth with stains Corrosion on circuit board after climate test Blistering under galvanization Fiber optic orientation Do you have questions? Our experienced team is available to meet your individual requirements and provide you with high-quality analytical solutions. Contact

  • Spectroscopy | ASO

    Spectroscopy Discover some of our methods. NMR (Nuclear Magnetic esonance) High-resolution NMR spectroscopy is a method for the detailed structural elucidation of organic substances. The samples are placed in a strong magnetic field and irradiated with radio frequency pulses. The change in the magnetization of the elements (eg hydrogen and carbon) is observed depending on their chemical environment. The resulting spectra provide information about functional groups, classes of compounds, relationships between individual molecular parts, structural isomerisms and even the complete structure of compounds. ​ application areas applicable to all types of organic compounds including polymers Mixtures can be quantified and impurities detected Molecular spectroscopy (IR/Raman/ UV-Vis) In molecular spectroscopy, the incoming light is absorbed or scattered. This is characteristic of certain molecular fragments. The recorded spectra show specific bands for certain molecular components, which makes it particularly easy to identify organic materials. ​ application areas Analysis of organic components Polymer characterization Damage analysis Stains and dirt Analysis of competitive products X-ray fluorescence Analysis (RFA) The X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) provides the elemental composition of a sample and allows the detection of many elements in trace concentrations. The method is suitable for both solid and liquid samples. ​ application areas Trace analysis Testing materials for RoHS compliance (Restriction on Hazardous Substances) Atom- Emissions Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) ICP-OES allows the determination of elements in aqueous solutions by optical emission spectroscopy using inductively coupled plasma (argon). Due to the high plasma temperature (10,000 K), the compounds to be analyzed in the sucked-in sample aerosols are atomized and additionally ionized. In the process, the valence electrons are raised to a higher energy level. When returning to the ground state, the previously absorbed energy is emitted as specific light energy. The ion lines are evaluated because they are relatively insensitive to excitation disturbances. The advantages are better precision/reproducibility and detection limits. Simultaneous multi-element analysis of up to 70 elements is state of the art today. application areas Metal analysis Environmental analysis Electron microscopy (REM-EDX) The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a device for imaging surface structures. It produces images with high resolution and depth of field. In addition, the distribution of different materials can be visualized. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) can also be used to analyze the local elemental composition of the different sample areas. application areas Structure and composition of components Damage analysis Stains and dirt Analysis of competitive products Surfaces- analytics (ESCA) Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (also XPS) analyzes (semiquantitatively) the elemental composition of the uppermost nanometers (10-15 atomic layers) of solids. ​ The method also provides information about the bonding states of the elements. The removal of the layers by sputtering allows the measurement of the depth distribution of elements (depth profile). ​ application areas Liability Wetting problems Paint peeling Surface and interface characterization Corrosion protection Reactivity of catalysts Do you have questions? Our experienced team is available to meet your individual requirements and provide you with high-quality analytical solutions. Contact

  • Services | ASO

    Service spectrum From standard tests to damage case analyses As an independent and accredited testing laboratory, we offer you accompanying analytics, from basic research to quality assurance and technical marketing. Our analysis spectrum ranges from simple routine analytics (standard tests) to individually prepared damage case analyses. We support you with our analytics in research and development projects, testing your raw materials and auxiliary materials as well as finished products. As part of initial sample testing for automotive, we confirm the tests required by the manufacturer. In addition to contract analysis, we also offer seminars on damage analysis and surface analysis. RAW MATERIAL ANALYTICS More PRODUCT ANALYTICS More DAMAGE ANALYTICS More SEMINARS More Climate-neutral services ASO is committed to climate protection. Since 2021, we have been offering our analytical services in a climate-neutral manner. Ask for our possibilities! Contact

  • Fibers and fabrics | ASO

    Automotive Analytical services for automotive suppliers Extract of our services From spinning process to coating – from raw material to damage analysis Raw material and polymer analysis Specification of polymers Moisture content according to Karl Fischer Solution viscosity Melt flow index Extractions Thermal properties Measurement of carboxyl end groups ​ Analysis of excipients Incoming inspection of preparations or finishes Chemical characterization of spinning baths Product analysis Mechanical strength (also under temperature) Color measurement emission Exposure, climate and weathering tests Abrasion resistance (Martindale) Colour fastness Soiling and cleaning behaviour Penetration behaviour of the coating into the thread composite Damage and process analysis Lint analysis on bobbins or fabrics Sieve filter analyses Surface structure of thread guides and godets Contamination on fabrics Tissue damage to airbag fabrics Analysis of competitive products Her EXPERT Erika Schuster Mail erika.schuster@aso-labor.de phone +49 6022 81 2140 Application examples Nozzle hole geometry of spinnerets Tensile tests under temperature Airbag damage analysis Spin filter analysis Solution viscosity Stability of emulsions Loss of strength after light fastness test Abrasion resistance according to Martindale Silicone coating of fabrics Cleaning cloth with stains Fabrics damage analysis Do you have questions? Our experienced team is available to meet your individual requirements and provide you with high-quality analytical solutions. Contact

  • ASO Analytik Service Obernburg | Prüfnormen

    ASO Analytik Service Obernburg Welcome to ASO, your trusted partner in analytical precision. With a dedicated team of 50 experts, we combine in-depth industry knowledge in the automotive and medical technology sectors with state-of-the-art analytical technology. Your vision is our focus. Our expertise guarantees tailor-made solutions based on trust and reliability to overcome your specific challenges. ​ Discover how we can make a difference for your business with accurate data and clear insights. Industry solutions Customized solutions for your industry. More on this Methods Overview: Chemical and physical test methods. More on this Services From basic research to technical marketing. More on this Do you have questions? Our experienced team is available to meet your individual requirements and provide you with high-quality analytical solutions. Contact

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